Twitter IPO

IPOs are beautiful when they work, but sometimes, after the initial flurry of buying, shares fall off hard.

Twitter shares jumped 73% in the company’s Wall Street debut.

Shares of Twitter jumped 73% in the company’s Wall Street debut, but does Twitter deserve a market value greater than three quarters of the S&P 500?  For this story and more tune in tonight.

Social network giant Twitter debuted for trading on Thursday—with bids surging above its offering price—in 2013’s most eagerly anticipated initial public offering and the most hyped stock sale since rival Facebook went public more than a year ago. Although some market analysts have expressed caution about the microblogging site’s lofty valuation and long-term prospects, investors stampeded to the offering. …

Twitter has yet to turn a profit, which has investors asking how the service will raise even more revenue in the future.

Now Twitter is all about advertising, but it’s taking steps to expand into entirely new businesses. It’s been laying the groundwork to build new revenue streams. Commerce The fact that Twitter’s core business is ads, means there’s potential for Twitter to help marketers sell stuff, not just when users shop online or in stores after leaving Twitter, …

Twitter has a couple big names in the spotlight: Twitter’s CEO Dick Costolo and co-founder and Chairman Jack Dorsey, who was recently profiled in The New Yorker and will own more than 4 percent of the company after its initial public offering. But there are a number of other key players who are responsible for creating and growing Twitter, and running …

It’s getting crowded! Fifteen companies are going public this week, the most since 2006.

Twitter executives have spent weeks on Wall Street and in major U.S. cities touting the company’s highly anticipated initial public offering, set to take place this week. But despite their best efforts to pitch the site’s profit prospects in mobile, international growth and TV integration, investors are still skeptical, results from a new AP-CNBC poll …