US Economy

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The debate has America split—literally. With Wisconsin‘s adoption of so-called right-to-work legislation earlier this year, 25 states now prohibit mandatory union dues, and with legislation being pushed in several more states, the right-to-work movement is talking about a national “tipping point.” Under right-to-work legislation, no person can be compelled, as a condition of employment, to …

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A satellite image of Hurricane Earl (left) and Tropical Storm Fiona in the Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 31, 2010.

As hurricane season comes upon us on June 1, we will be treated to a variety of hurricane forecasts, with different guesses about when and where landfall will hit, how intense the storm will be, and how much flooding we might expect. All those forecasts will change each day. And some of those forecasts will …

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Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of Shasta Lake at Bailey Cove in Lakehead, Calif.

As bad as California’s drought has gotten, a strengthening El Nino season could mean help is on the way, bringing much needed showers to the Golden State. But El Nino may present its own problems. A CNBC analysis of annual California rainfall over the past 60 years shows a significantly wetter rain season—averaging nearly five …

David Mdzinarishvili | Reuters
U.S. military in Tbilisi, Georgia.

As America pays tribute on Memorial Day to U.S. service members who gave their lives for this country, it’s also important to remember others who have served and are still with us. Some veterans and their families may face significant financial challenges as they transition to civilian life, and many may not be aware of …

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At a time when 8.5 million Americans still don’t have jobs, some 40 percent have given up even looking. The revelation, contained in a new survey Wednesday showing how much work needs to be done yet in the U.S. labor market, comes as the labor force participation rate remains mired near 37-year lows. A tight …

Q1 GDP debate continues

There may be a big problem with the way the government has been calculating first quarter growth.

In-home water recycling system

Diana Olick shows us the first in-home water recycling system that could save two-thirds of the water in a home.

Top young economic minds

High school students from across the country got to test their knowledge of the Federal Reserve and economics in the National Economics Challenge. Steve Liesman moderated the competition.

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Rain pours from thunderclouds on the U.S. West Coast.

Climate and weather forecasters are saying there is an 80 percent chance the climate pattern known as El Niño will through the rest of 2015. But what is El Niño? El Niño is the name given to changes in the patterns of trade winds across the Pacific Ocean, which can cause unusual warming in ocean …

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Customers look at boots at a Macy's in New York.

U.S. consumer sentiment dropped in May and missed expectations of an uptick, according to a report released on Friday. The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan’s preliminary May reading on the index was 88.6. It was down from the previous month’s reading of 95.9 and missed estimates of 96. The decline in optimism about the economy was …

Where’s the consumer?

Courtney Reagan takes a look at Macy’s sales slump and at what might be holding the consumer back.

Sluggish retail sales

Consumer spending barely budged in April. What does that mean for economic growth and the Federal Reserve?

Outrage at bottled water companies

The bottled water industry is feeling the heat as California’s devastating drought rages on.

Goldilocks employment report

Hampton Pearson tells us why both Wall Street and Main Street cheered this jobs report.

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The U.S. economy created 223,000 jobs in April, bouncing back from a sluggish period the first three months of the year, as companies shook off the effects of a surging U.S. dollar and falling profits. The unemployment rate fell to a seven-year low of 5.4 percent, the Labor Department said Friday. Economists expected nonfarm payrolls …