Politics and Government

New chapter for U.S.-Cuba relations

President Obama announced sweeping changes to U.S. policy with Cuba that could, eventually, create opportunities for both investors and business.

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The U.S. is starting talks with Cuba to normalize full diplomatic relations and open an embassy, according to U.S. officials. The expanded relationship would also open imports of Cuban cigars somewhat, according to a CNN report. U.S. President Obama, Cuba’s Raul Castro plan to speak separately at noon ET about relations between the two countries. …

Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images
U.S. Capitol building, Washington.

The latest assault on private pensions may be coming from the U.S. Congress. Lawmakers on Wednesday were finalizing a deal to shore up the government’s pension insurance fund with provisions that would raise premiums and allow troubled pension plans covering more than one employer to cut retiree benefits. As of midday Wednesday, the reform provisions, …

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Millionaires are sharply divided on their choice for the next President of the U.S., according to the second CNBC Millionaire Survey released today. Yet if a vote were held today, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would be the overall favorite among millionaire voters. The survey polled 500 people with investable assets of $1 million …

Aude Guerrucci-Pool | Getty Images
President Barack Obama gestures as he delivers remarks at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable at the group's headquarters on Dec. 3, 2014, in Washington.

There’s a reason a relaxed President Barack Obama lingered so long on Wednesday with members of the Business Roundtable. He was enjoying their company. That’s not as odd as it sounds for a president sometimes reputed to be hostile toward business, for several reasons. To begin with, the Roundtable is the white-glove business lobby for …

CEOs meet with Obama

CEOs engaged in a rare question and answer session with President Obama, delving deeper into concerns about regulation and the widening wage gap.

Business Roundtable: CEOs weigh in

Wall Street & Washington intersected today when some of the biggest names in business discussed the biggest issues facing their companies.

Goldman Sachs gets grilled on aluminum prices

Lawmakers go after Goldman Sachs, accusing it of manipulating the prices of aluminum.

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The Democrat-controlled Senate failed to gather the 60 votes it needed to approve the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The Senate’s 59-41 vote Tuesday night was a nail-biter to the end. The Keystone XL pipeline project has been at the center of a major political debate since 2008 when TransCanda applied for permission to …

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Republican efforts to limit the power of the Federal Reserve are expected to gain traction in 2015, when the GOP takes majority control of the Senate after midterm election victories. “For sure, the scrutiny on both the regulatory and the monetary side will be turned up a notch in the Senate compared to what it …

Elizabeth Schulze | CNBC
Crews from Enbridge Energy Partners inspect a crude oil pipeline in Thief River Falls, Minn.

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would authorize construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline from Canada. In a vote fraught with politics and overshadowed by the Louisiana Senate runoff, the Republican-led House approved the pipeline by a wide margin, with 31 Democrats joining 221 GOP members to pass the bill. …

Veterans Affairs chief announces restructuring

Veterans Affairs secretary Robert McDonald rolled out a new plan to clean up the beleaguered agency.

Net neutrality debate

President Obama took a firm stand on an open and free internet, which sent shares of cable companies down.

GOP congress and the economy

What will Republican controlled senate mean for the U.S. economy and the Federal Reserve?

After midterm elections, what will get done?

Democrats and Republicans say they will work together. What are the odds Washington will actually get work done on issues important to business?