Personal Finance

Sharon Epperson reports on students in New Jersey who are learning the basics of saving and spending.

If you’re hoping to grow your family next year, take these four key steps now to prepare.

Many people have enough saved for retirement to claim Social Security later than they do, according to a new study.

Courtesy Eric Chen (Photo by JHU Sheridan Libraries/Gado/Getty Images) Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.  Americans leave college today with more debt than ever before. Some schools are trying to reverse the trend by instituting a no-loans policy. Most recently, Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, announced he would give $1.8 billion to his alma …

Don’t let what you owe hold you back.

Before you give cash to your favorite charity, there are a couple of strategies you might want to consider instead.

“Think of a credit freeze as a state-of-the-art home security system that helps keep the bad guys out.”

Recover now from summer spending so you won’t feel squeezed at the holidays.

Deciding whether to use extra cash to pay down debt or build an emergency fund depends on several factors, from your employment situation to your tolerance threshold for debt stress.

The risk of needing long-term care won’t go away if you ignore it, said Marguerita M. Cheng, CEO of Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Here’s how to begin preparing.

As the market rally continues to break records, here’s one thing you need to remember: The good times can’t last.

These tips can help you detect whether you’re working with a dishonest financial professional.

Sharon Epperson joins us on set to talk about common money mistakes made in college — and how to avoid them.

Most students are navigating new financial territory when they reach college. Here’s how to avoid costly mistakes.

Here are some key steps to take right away if you win big in Tuesday night’s drawing.