Markets

Brendan McDermid | Reuters
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

U.S. stocks opened lower on Monday, extending the S&P 500’s longest weekly loss streak since 2011, after International Business Machines cut its earnings forecast. “It’s not the entirety of technology. It’s not the entirety of the whole market, but a down 8 percent IBM is going to take the market down,” said Art Hogan, chief market …

Volatile market, stoic Fed

Steve Liesman takes a look at the public disagreement within the Federal Reserve over what it should do next.

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

U.S. stocks surged on Friday as investors bet on further stimulus from central banks and corporations including General Electric and Morgan Stanley reporting profits that topped expectations. Morgan Stanley gained in early New York trading after the investment bank tallied third-quarter earnings that beat estimates. General Electric climbed after its quarterly profit exceeded expectations. The CBOE …

Your next move

If you’re looking to get aggressive or defensive, we have a fund manager with some investment suggestions.

Bull vs. Bear

The day after Wall Street’s wild ride, one of the biggest market bulls stands by his year-end target of 2300 on the S&P 500.

Wild ride for widely-held stocks

How have widely-held stocks performed amid all of the turmoil in the markets?

Adam Jeffery | CNBC
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as the Alibaba Group IPO goes public.

Call it coincidence if you will, but the biggest initial public offering of all time also happened to hit Wall Street the same day the stock market peaked. Almost at the exact moment, actually: Just eight minutes after Alibaba‘s much-ballyhooed Sept. 19 IPO—which soared at the start but fizzled soon after—hit the market, the S&P …

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Stocks shook off steep losses, as small caps and transports moved higher Thursday, but strategists say the selloff will likely continue until investor psychology changes and they feel more pain. “I think there’s potentially more downside. My target on the S&P is around 1,800, the Nasdaq is around 4,000 and the Dow is 15,400,” said …

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Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

U.S. stocks cut Thursday losses, with the S&P 500 shaking off losses to turn slightly higher, as investors weighed global worries against mostly better-than-expected U.S. earnings and economic reports. “The market is not trading off of fundamental news, it is trading off worries, whether it’s the importing of weak economic growth or Ebola,” said Mark …

Market volatility & small businesses

How is the volatility on Wall Street and falling energy prices impacting business owners on Main Street?

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Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Is Wall Street’s biggest question: After a 7 percent drop from the highs, has the S&P 500 bottomed out? The answer may be impossible to know for sure, but historical analysis suggests that stocks may have a bit further to fall. Carter Worth of Sterne Agee looked back on all the market’s corrections of 5 …

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Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

U.S. stocks recovered after opening sharply lower on Wednesday as a Europe woes and weak economic data weighed heavily on markets. Financials led declines on the S&P and traded more than 1.5 percent lower, while JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs were among the greatest blue-chip decliners. In a cumulative move of about 600 points in …

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

A trio of weak data, showing a pullback in consumer spending, softer manufacturing and falling inflation, fueled selling Wednesday in an already jittery stock market on fears that the U.S. economy cannot hold the line against a global slowdown. Economists immediately slashed their U.S. GDP growth forecast for the third quarter. Barclays and Credit Suisse …

Three things to watch

What is causing the turmoil in the markets? Bob Pisani takes a look at three things investors are closely watching.

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Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Technical strategist Abigail Doolittle is holding tight to her prediction of market doom ahead, asserting that a recent move in Wall Street’s fear gauge is signaling the way. Doolittle, founder of Peak Theories Research, has made headlines lately suggesting a market correction worse than anyone thinks is ahead. The long-term possibility, she has said, is …