Patti Domm, CNBC.com’s Posts

Pre-game and post-game, Wall Street will be handicapping outcomes of what has been the most contentious presidential election in recent history.

An agreement by OPEC to work toward a production cut could put a floor under oil and points to the strain low crude prices have had on producers.

Now that the Fed’s meeting is over, market focus could swing to Monday night’s presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen, based on her recent remarks at the Fed’s Jackson Hole conference, clearly wants to get back in the game.

The biggest buyers of U.S. Treasurys have turned fickle on U.S. debt, just when they may be needed most.

Disappointing retail sales raises more concern about the consumer and reaffirms the view that the Fed will not raise rates next week.

Drivers may see the cheapest average fall gasoline prices since the year President Barack Obama was first elected.

The Republican convention kicked off with its first big market surprise – Donald Trump wants to break up the big banks.

March’s jobs report was solid, but it contained a warning signal of slower labor growth ahead.

The rebound in stocks could continue for now, but some analysts say it would not be surprising to see the market trip up soon.

Hiring slowed substantially in January, but the fact that more people were working for higher pay signals strength.

Stressed-out markets will get a look Wednesday at the health of the U.S. services sector.

Stocks erased huge intraday losses with buyers jumping into momentum and other downtrodden names.

Stocks took a thumping on the first trading day of the year, leaving investors to wonder if 2016 will be the year the bull market gives up.