John Harwood, NBR, CNBC.com’s Posts

One week in, the hard political labor all lies ahead for Donald Trump — with the president himself making it harder.

After endless debate over the honesty of America’s presidential candidates, voters on Monday night get 90 minutes of pure transparency. The first 2016 general election debate will place both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump under a microscope more searching than either has experienced before. The audience may reach 100 million people, encompassing the vast majority of …

CNBC chief Washington correspondent John Harwood has covered nine presidential campaigns. Here’s his take on why this one may be the most memorable.

With huge wins in five states, it’s little wonder Donald Trump declared himself the presumptive Republican nominee.

This week’s contretemps, particularly with women, are another test for Donald Trump’s survival skills.

Call them the pundits of the plutocracy, a quite group of election analysts serving Wall Street and the financial community who prefer lower profiles.

As the GOP schism grows, Super Tuesday took us a step closer to a Donald Trump versus Hillary Clinton brawl for the White House.

Just before the South Carolina primary, John Kasich tells CNBC’s John Harwood what he sees wrong about the race.

Ted Cruz has inched ahead of Donald Trump among Republican voters nationally, according to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

The smashing victories of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump will have an impact for the 2016 presidential race.

By missing the GOP debate, Donald Trump was spared all but glancing, humorous blows from those battling to catch up.

The latest GOP presidential debate shows that the party’s 2016 nomination race has turned into a fierce battle between Ted Cruz and Donald Trump.

If there’s one thing as surprising as the fact that outsider newcomers have outpaced establishment veterans in the Republican presidential race so far, it’s that the contest is playing out in a state that has legalized marijuana.

The first members of the massive baby boom generation began retiring four years ago. Tens of millions are right behind them, leaving politicians in Washington the unenviable task of finding money to shore up the two popular entitlement giants.

Watch the interview here Donald J. Trump. Long a flamboyant figure in American life — as a real-estate developer and reality show host — Trump, 69, entered the race in June in unorthodox fashion. At a moment when Republican leaders hoped to repair relations with Latino voters, he seized on the issue of illegal immigration, …