Jeff Cox, CNBC.com’s Posts

Randall Hill | Reuters
A worker installs brake cables at the Bicycle Corporation of America plant in Manning, South Carolina.

Job creation boomed in February by 295,000 despite the brutal winter conditions, and the unemployment rate dropped to 5.5 percent, the Labor Department said Friday. Despite the strong month, the picture was essentially the same for the American worker: Pay rose just 3 cents an hour, representing a 2.0 percent annualized gain as wage inflation …

Kevin Lamarque | Reuters
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen adjusts her glasses as she testifies at a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on "Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress" on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 24, 2015.

This is a breaking news article. Please check back for updates. At the height of the financial crisis in 2009, Janet Yellen told her colleagues things were so bad that people were literally breaking into piggy banks to get cash. The Federal Reserve chair, who headed the central bank’s San Francisco district at the time, …

100704890-167567625.530x298

Private-sector job creation grew less than expectated in February, as the services and goods-producing sectors both slowed from recent months, according to a report from ADP. Companies added 212,000 positions for the month, down from an upwardly revised 250,000 in January and the slowest pace since August 2014, the report filed by ADP and Moody’s …

100893640-100724438-federal-reserve-clouds_r.578x276

If investors learned anything from Fed Chair Janet Yellen’s testimony to Congress this week, it’s that the central bank is willing to wait for inflation to catch up to employment before hiking rates. It could be a long wait—longer, in fact, than many market participants anticipate. Language tweaks in Yellen’s semiannual appearance Tuesday and Wednesday …

Getty Images
Janet Yellen, Chair of the Federal Reserve.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has a few fences to mend. That’s because the normally chummy relationship the U.S. central bank has with Wall Street hit a bump last week when minutes from the Open Market Committee’s most recent meeting left room for confusion about the Fed‘s path forward. Where the market thought the FOMC was …

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Employees assist shoppers at the check out counter of a Walmart store in Los Angeles.

When the biggest retailer in the world talks wages, other companies are going to listen. Wal-Mart‘s shock announcement Thursday that it is going to begin increasing the minimum wage for its employees sparked hopes that a movement toward higher pay for those at the the lower rungs would gain momentum. If so, that would generate long-awaited …

Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images
The Federal Reserve building in Washington, D.C.

Federal Reserve policymakers voted in unison last month not to raise interest rates, but the discussions leading to the vote show considerable levels of hand-wringing over the course ahead. January meeting minutes released Wednesday show a Fed Open Market Committee concerned over its credibility and the path it should take toward normalizing monetary policy. Issue …

Albert Lozano | Getty Images

Though bank lending to consumers has slowed to a near stop in recent months, there is one place people can go to get a cash infusion. Credit unions have seen a surge in lending, pushing the 2014 total to the highest level since 2005 as the industry recovers from the financial crisis slowdown, according to …

David Grogan | CNBC
Carl Icahn

Hedge fund investing is expensive, but following what the big-name managers do is not. Such is the premise of “clone” funds, a small but growing sector of the market in which managers track what the best names in the hedge industry—think Leon Cooperman, Carl Icahn or David Tepper—are doing via the 13f disclosure forms they …

Getty Images
Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Deep-pocketed investors believe U.S. stocks will be the best place to put money this year. So far, they’ve been wrong. In fact, the domestic market has underperformed most other global indexes, particularly those in Europe and Asia, as the U.S. Federal Reserve gets set to tighten monetary policy while its global counterparts are opening the …

Randall Hill | Reuters
A worker installs brake cables at the Bicycle Corporation of America plant in Manning, South Carolina.

The unemployment rate edged higher but the U.S. economy added a better-than-expected 257,000 jobs in January, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of new jobs created in January was expected to total 234,000, while the unemployment rate was seen coming in at 5.6 percent. Full-time workers surged, gaining …

Getty Images
Construction work on a road reconstruction project.

Plunging interest rates fueled a municipal bond bonanza in January for communities looking to cut their financing costs. Muni bond issuance soared past $27 billion for the month, the biggest January in five years and a potential harbinger that the market could be in for a huge year, according to an analysis from Chris Mauro, …

Source: CNBC
Jeffrey Gundlach

The Federal Reserve has little justification to raise interest rates amid a deflationary global backdrop, bond expert Jeff Gundlach said. “There was a year, 1937, when the Federal Reserve tightened credit conditions prematurely and it led to the second leg of the Great Depression,” said Gundlach, who confessed to being “worried” that the Fed would …

Stan Honda | AFP | Getty Images
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Exchange-traded funds are on their way to $5 trillion in assets, a path that will travel around the globe as more nations dive into the increasingly popular investment vehicle, according to a study released Monday. Asset managers responding to a PricewaterhouseCoopers analysis of the industry believe that lofty mark will be attained as soon as …

Brian Snyder | Reuters
Shoppers in the parking lot of a Walmart store in Massachusetts.

A year in which the U.S. economy was supposed to turn the corner and lead the world sure has started out in bumpy fashion. Retail sales, manufacturing and inflation readings sputtered into the end of 2014, according to reports released this week. Meanwhile, weekly jobless claims jumped back above 300,000 and a new study called a …