Jeff Cox, CNBC.com’s Posts

President Donald Trump raised his demands Monday on the Federal Reserve, calling for the central bank to cut interest rates by a full percentage point and to restart its crisis-era money-printing program.

President Donald Trump wants the Federal Reserve to help head off a feared economic slowdown, but it’s not clear the central bank has enough firepower left to do so.

Consumer prices rose more quickly than expected in July as gasoline reversed a two-month decline and the cost for rent continued to climb.

President Donald Trump made his support of a weak dollar official, saying Thursday he is disappointed in the strong currency and is blaming the Federal Reserve.

President Donald Trump pressed his demand Wednesday for the Federal Reserve to accelerate interest rate cuts, saying the U.S. central bank needs to keep pace with its global counterparts.

Job openings edged lower in June as the labor market continues to tighten, the Labor Department reported Tuesday.

Payroll growth rose in line with expectations in July and the unemployment rate remained at 3.7% amid a sharp jump in the size of the labor force to its highest level ever.

President Donald Trump’s move to intensify the trade dispute with China comes with an important backstop: a Federal Reserve that looks ready to support any economic weakness with interest rate cuts.

Judy Shelton, who is President Donald Trump’s likely nominee to the Federal Reserve board, warned Thursday about the dangers of central bank actions.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the central bank’s rate cut approved Wednesday was part an ongoing move to adjust to economic conditions though no guarantee of future cuts.

Companies added more jobs than expected in July amid concerns that the U.S. economy was slowing and the labor market was nearing full employment.

If the Federal Reserve fulfills expectations and cuts interest rates Wednesday, it will have to convince the public it is doing so to preserve economic growth and not kowtowing to a very vocal president who is demanding looser monetary policy.

While corporate earnings so far have been a bit better than feared, that’s not been the case for companies that do the majority of their business overseas and are more susceptible to the ongoing tariff battle between the U.S. and China.

President Donald Trump ripped into China in a series of tweets Tuesday just as the two sides are set to resume stalled negotiations toward a much-anticipated trade agreement.

President Donald Trump kept up the pressure on the Federal Reserve, calling Tuesday for the central bank to enact a substantial interest rate cut.