Christina Farr’s Posts

Hospitals, many of which are increasingly in dire financial straits, are weighing a lucrative new opportunity: Selling patient health information to tech companies.

Doctors are starting to use TikTok to talk to teens and young adults about health issues that matter to them.

Google has waded into a privacy flap over a partnership with Ascension, a major U.S. hospital network, to collaborate on tools make sense of information about patients and help doctors search the medical record.

Facebook is debuting a new tool, called Preventive Health, that reminds users to get medical checkups, vaccines and tests.

Ooda Health is attempting to upend the broken system of medical billing, which is putting millions of Americans in debt.

One of the many wild medical pursuits in Silicon Valley is the effort to slow down the aging process. Sajad Zalzala is trying to make it a reality.

Wearable heart monitor company iRhythm is teaming up with Alphabet’s health company Verily on unspecified new technology that will monitor people at risk for atrial fibrillation, a common form of irregular heart rhythm that is associated with strokes and other serious health problems.

The first generation of wearable devices, like smartwatches and activity trackers, were aimed at helping generally healthy people track their physical activity. Now, the medical industry is looking for ways to use smart gadgets to monitor patients with chronic illnesses.

State Farm, the provider of car, home and life insurance, is working with Amazon on a new Alexa tool that helps people stay in contact with their aging family members.

Apple’s health team has seen a slew of departures in the past year after a series of leadership changes and internal disagreements about direction.

Microsoft has snapped up David Rhew from Samsung Electronics, where he worked as a chief medical officer overseeing the company’s health efforts in the U.S.

As Amazon bolsters its PillPack business to take on the prescription drug market, industry stalwarts CVS and Walgreens are vigorously defending their turf, setting up a protracted battle between the old guard and the new.

Representatives from Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft joined up in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, alongside some of the largest health insurers and hospitals, to announce plans to provide consumers with easier access to their medical information.

Just over a year after buying online pharmacy PillPack for $753 million, Amazon is engaged in a bitter battle with an incumbent player in the pharmacy industry, which sources tell CNBC is working behind the scenes to prevent the company from accessing important patient data.