Bob Pisani, NBR, CNBC.com’s Posts

Survey shows a majority of U.S. CFOs believe that the country will be in a recession within one year.

The three “legs” of the retirement “stool” (private savings, pensions, and Social Security) are all in dire shape.

It’s not just that the S&P 500, up 11.9 percent, is having its best quarter since 2012. Everything is up, including stocks and bonds.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s survey of roughly 200 global fund managers is often a contrarian indicator.

We are still in the longest bull market on record, yet the entire trading community seems convinced the bull is about to roll over.

Fear about the government shutdown, the tariff war and the slowdown in China are all still around, but now investors are also afraid of missing out on the rally.

Investors were excited about Apple hitting a $1 trillion market value, but it’s unlikely to result in the one thing the trading community really wants: higher volumes.

With markets at historic highs and investor interest growing, some are wondering if there are enough shares to go around.

The Inside ETF conference has begun, and by all accounts it is the biggest yet. Here’s what attendees will be talking about.

Fourth quarter earnings have generally been above expectations. But 2016 wasn’t exactly a banner year for earnings.

The Dow Jones industrial average is on the verge of passing 20,000. Here’s the primary reason why.

Stock ownership is increasingly concentrated in the hands of the wealthy.

Well, this wasn’t supposed to happen. Oil was supposed to be down big if there was no Doha agreement, right?

While the sudden moves in the Chinese currency—and the concurrent concern about a slower economy—are the main cause of China’s stock market volatility, the country’s stock market structure may itself be exacerbating the selloff.

China tested its new system-wide circuit breaker last night. The good news is it works. The bad news is the circuit breakers themselves may be part of the problem.