Annie Palmer’s Posts

WeWork is laying off 2,400 employees as it works to cut costs and right-size the business, the company confirmed to CNBC.

Disney+ appears to have been hit by some technical errors just a few hours into its official launch on Tuesday.

Facebook is taking on PayPal’s Venmo with a new payments service that will soon be able to be used across its family of apps.

Amazon has begun hiring for a new grocery store that’s slated to open next year in a neighborhood of Los Angeles.

New York State Attorney General Letitia James announced Tuesday that 47 attorneys general from states and U.S. territories plan to take part in a New York-led antitrust probe into Facebook.

Netflix is raising another $2 billion in debt to fund additional content creation and other expenses, the company announced on Monday.

Airbnb’s losses doubled year-over-year in the first quarter to $306 million, as the home-sharing start-up ramps up marketing spend ahead of a possible IPO in 2020, according to a report in The Information.

Uber has laid off about 350 employees across several teams within the organization, including Uber Eats, the company confirmed Monday.

Online travel company Booking Holdings has dropped out of Facebook’s Libra Association, the company told CNBC Monday. Booking joins a growing list of firms who have exited the embattled cryptocurrency project.

In a note to clients on Thursday, Goldman Sachs analysts say Netflix’s long history of competition should help it weather the streaming wars.

Fitbit shares rose briefly Wednesday after the company announced it would shift its manufacturing operations outside of China to avoid tariffs.

Tesla is facing new scrutiny from a federal auto safety agency around battery issues in some Model S and Model X vehicles.

Microsoft made a surprise announcement Wednesday of a new two-screened Android smartphone, the Surface Duo. The device will launch in late 2020, in time for the holiday season. No pricing details were announced.

The National Labor Relations Board has ordered Google to let employees openly debate political and workplace issues, according to the Wall Street Journal.

When Jack Dorsey started sending out a string of bizarre tweets last week, it was clear that his account had been compromised. Less obvious to his more than 4 million followers was how the attackers took control of the Twitter CEO’s account for almost 20 minutes.