Transcript: Nightly Business Report – May 28, 2018

ANNOUNCER: This is NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT with Sue Herera and Bill
Griffeth.

SUE HERERA, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT ANCHOR: Good evening, everyone. And
welcome to this special edition of NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT.

Memorial Day is, of course, the day when we honor the men and women who
serve in our military.

BILL GRIFFETH, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT ANCHOR: It`s also, of course,
considered the unofficial start to summer — a time when thoughts turn to
the beach and to vacations, and believe it or not, to the stock market and
the economy as well.

HERERA: Indeed. So, that is where we begin tonight, with the stock
market.

Some investors think that as temperatures rise, they can take the summer
off. But a number of market batchers say that would be a mistake,
especially this year.

Dominic Chu takes a look at the road ahead for stocks.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DOMINIC CHU, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT CORRESPONDENT: Sell in May and go
away. There`s been a feelings among some investors that the summer months
are ones to stay away from. But recent market history doesn`t look all
that bad, during the weeks between Memorial Day and Labor Day, going all
the way back to 1990, the S&P 500 has on average lodged just a slight loss.

This year, there will be a different set of risks to watch versus what
we`ve seen the last few years.

DARIN RICHARDS, ALRICH WEALTH CIO: Any kind of inflation jump above
expectations, the Fed is going to get more aggressive, is going to put
pressure on stocks. It`s probably going to raise the dollar. It`s going
to make it harder for large cap multinationals.

CHU: Of course, there`s another market cliche, bull markets like to climb
a wall of worry. Risks don`t necessarily mean imminent market drops.
There are still reasons to be optimistic about stocks.

JOE DURAN, UNITED CAPITAL CEO AND FOUNDING PARTNER: The economy that
wields growth is really good. That`s pushing everything along. And if we
continue to grow the 3 percent to 5 percent rate in the U.S., and even
faster in the emerging markets, that`s a great sign. As long as it`s
steady and incremental, we`ll be fine.

CHU: Of course, once the summer months pass. There will be a whole new
set of potential risks to the market, including those stemming from the
uncertainty around the midterm election in congress. But until then,
traders will be trying to see what will set the tone for stocks which have
been stuck in neutral for the last couple of months.

For NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT, I`m Dominic Chu.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRIFFETH: Let`s take a look now at what`s in the forecast in the markets
and the economy in the coming months.

Joining us tonight, Nancy Tengler. She`s chief investment officer at
Heartland Financial. And John Lynch, who`s chief investment strategist at
LPL Financial.

Good to see you both, folks. Thanks for joining us tonight.

NANCY TENGLER, CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICER, HEARTLAND FINANCIAL: Thank you.

JOHN LYNCH, CHIEF INVESTMENT STRATEGIST, LPL FINANCIAL: Thank you.

GRIFFETH: Nancy, it sounds like you`re willing to take a flyer on some
beaten-down stocks this summer. Yes?

TENGLER: Well, yes. I mean, to Dominic`s point earlier, midterm election
years are great years to accumulate stocks because the volatility in the
first three quarters is dramatic. But 12 months after, we`ve never seen a
decline since 1946.

So, I like my odds here, as Wall Street takes off, I`d like to pick away at
some of the higher quality names that have been beaten up in this
correction.

HERERA: All right. So, John, if Wall Street is going to take off, as
Nancy says, how about the economy? I mean, it seems to be firing on all
cylinders. Will that continue?

LYNCH: I think so, Sue. I think Nancy makes a very good point. You know,
anytime volatility shows up, I think it will be a great time for investors
to take advantage, because those moves can be justified by economic
activity.

We see the consumers benefitting from tax refunds. We see businesses
employing not only changes from the reason tax cut, but increasing capital
expenditures. We think that`s going to be a boost for the economy as well.
And we`re still projecting 2.5 percent to 3 percent pace of GDP for the
remainder of 2018.

GRIFFETH: Nancy, let`s name some names here. These companies, you like
FedEx (NYSE:FDX), which has seen recent weakness, 3M (NYSE:MMM) which is
down big this year and Splunk.

TENGLER: I know, isn`t it fun to say, Bill?

GRIFFETH: It is. Yes.

TENGLER: Yes. So, FedEx (NYSE:FDX) is a name I have recommended on your
air in the past. It is a company that has done all the heavy lifting from
a capex standpoint already, big beneficiary of the tax bill. And they have
raised guidance and Wall Street is kind of yawning. They raised it in
March. They`re guiding above analyst expectations, and they`re big
beneficiaries of a robust economy in e-commerce growth. So, this feels
like a gift to me and we`re just picking away at it in our portfolios.

HERERA: But one of the things, John, that might impact the stocks like a
FedEx (NYSE:FDX) and others would be rising fuel costs and rising oil
prices. Do you expect price to move just slightly higher in the near term,
especially given the tensions between the U.S. and Iran? Or are we going
to see dramatically higher oil prices?

LYNCH: I lost audio.

TENGLER: I can jump in on that if you`d like.

HERERA: Go right ahead, Nancy.

TENGLER: OK. Well, this is a company that certainly hedges for higher oil
costs, but I do think that as the major — the net new producer, marginal
producer in the U.S. has a lot more influence on oil prices than they`ve
had in the past. And actually stronger oil prices are not a bad thing for
the economy, they`re just a bit of a tax on the consumer.

So, we`ll have to see if that close down e-commerce, but it hasn`t
historically. And I think FedEx (NYSE:FDX) is really well-poised to
benefit from a growing economy. So, it will mitigate it, Sue, for sure,
but I think there are opportunities still for that company.

GRIFFETH: Last week, Nancy, we learned that the Fed was willing to allow
inflation to run hotter than its target of 2 percent. Do you see it going
much beyond that? And are you playing the inflation game right now.
Buying anything that would benefit from higher prices?

TENGLER: So, this inflation game has been elusive, hasn`t it?

GRIFFETH: Yes.

TENGLER: I think that, you know, we still think that net-net, the
consumers are beneficiaries of Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) and online providers,
and so that has kept prices pretty low. That said, I do expect to see Fed
raise rates again. I do expect to see inflation continue to pressure
upward, but I don`t see it dramatically moving out of whack.

I don`t — this is not the `70s, because we have mitigating, offsetting
aspects to the whole economic inflationary pressure. So, we`re not
targeting high — company that is benefit from inflation, we start with
valuation, and then we fill in around the gap.

HERERA: All right. I`m going to skip down to Splunk, because I want to
say the word, but also because you say — you say that you have to make
sure that you`ve got your floaties on, which to me indicates a riskier
pick, correct?

TENGLER: It is indeed, Sue. This is for the a typical pick that I would
bring. I`m a dividend-focused investor, but we also look at sales as a way
of measuring valuation. This is a company that`s growing sales above 30
percent a year in the sweet spot of data collection for Websites, mobile
applications, the things that Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) is being scrutinized
for. They are growing quickly in the cloud as well.

While it`s up 75 percent over the last year, the growth potential is
enormous. This is a smaller holding, you buy it, you put it away for the
next three to five years and you`ll be in good shape.

GRIFFETH: All right. Nancy, good to see you again. Thank you. Happy
Memorial Day.

TENGLER: You too. Thanks, Bill.

GRIFFETH: Nancy Tengler with Heartland Financial.

And we obviously had technical problems with John Lynch at LPL Financial.
We wish him a happy Memorial Day as well.

HERERA: Well, if you got stuck in traffic this weekend, you certainly were
not alone. Millions of Americans took a road trip.

And as Phil LeBeau reports, the strong economy is driving people to get
away.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PHIL LEBEAU, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT CORRESPONDENT: The all-American road
trip is alive and well. AAA estimates more than 41 million people traveled
somewhere Memorial Day weekend, an increase of almost 5 percent compared to
last year, and the highest number getting away for the holiday since 2005.

TAMRA JOHNSON, AAA: The economy is doing very well, and that has helped to
boost consumer confidence from last year. And as consumers are more
confident, they spend more. And so, we see that they are investing more
money in vacation which has led to a high travel volume.

LEBEAU: The majority of those who hit the road did it by driving
somewhere. For the first time in four years, many found prices at the pump
at or above $3 a gallon. The surge in prices is due to oil climbing to
well over $70 a barrel in recent week.

While the spike in prices maybe catching the eye of those filling up. They
have not hit the point where people are cancelling road trips because of
the cost of gas. For a fifth straight year, airlines expected to see an
increase in business for the holidays with an estimated 3.1 million taking
off.

SHARON PINKERTON, AIRLINES FOR AMERICA: There`s no doubt that people are
confident about the economy. They have a little more money in their
pocketbooks, and the fact that fares are a bargain right now means that
people are saying, hey, let`s get away for the weekend.

LEBEAU: While the average domestic round trip ticket for a light this
weekend was $336, airfares remain under $260 round trip, which has prompted
more to get away.

Airfares and gas prices are expected to keep rising this summer. The
question is, by how much, and will that prompt Americans to cut their
summer travel plans?

But right now, low unemployment and high consumer confidence are combining
to drive many people to want to get away.

Phil LeBeau, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT, Chicago.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRIFFETH: How much of an impact will rising gas prices have on travel this
summer?

Joining us to talk about that, Patrick DeHaan, who is senior petroleum
analyst at GasBuddy.

Patrick, good to see you. Thanks for joining us tonight.

PATRICK DEHAAN, SENIOR PETROLEUM ANALYST, GASBUDDY: Thanks for having me.

GRIFFETH: We`re already, what, 3-1/2 year highs for gasoline, how much
higher do you think we go this summer?

DEHAAN: I think in the next couple days, if not by the conclusion of, say,
Tuesday we could be looking at a national average that`s $3 a gallon. We
are slowly creeping up to that. And though we`re talking about the first
major summer driving holiday of the year, we only have three of them.

I would expect anyone to really cut back as a result, but what you may
start to see cut back is between those holidays, on some of those road
trips. People may be staying a little closer to home.

HERERA: You know, it`s interesting, though, when we`ve had higher gas
prices in past, it often was not coupled with an economy that is as strong
as it is now. Does that factor into the equation and make people more
willing to take on that higher or perhaps not?

DEHAAN: I think without a doubt, it does to a certain degree. People
still have to get to the jobs that they have. As you say, the unemployment
rate is very low. So, a lot of this demand is not going to be deterred by
the fact that gas prices are hitting these multiyear highs.

But what you may see is perhaps less spending as a sidetrack on these
trips, perhaps less one — one less trip out to eat or staying closer to
home. But it`s going to affect the low and low and mid incomes more so
than anyone else. And again, I wouldn`t expect a huge hit to this, because
the economy continues to strengthen.

GRIFFETH: What was it, 10 years ago, when the average was around $4 a
gallon? Are we going to go back to that at some point, do you think?

DEHAAN: I don`t think that we`ll get close to that at all. In fact, we`ll
have to see how the OPEC meeting that`s happening in June shakes out, but
my suspicions is that with growing pressure on President Trump, there may
be some action from OPEC. You may see more oil being produced here come
the middle of the summer. And that could result in prices that it ease
slightly, but I would expect the national average to stay in the upper $2 a
gallon race, or even perhaps even though very low $3 a gallon rate.

HERERA: On the other hand, though, you have a situation developing with
Iran, and tensions rising between the U.S. and Iran, and questions about
whether they say in the nuclear deal and their shipment of oil. How does
that factor into the equation?

DEHAAN: Well, certainly. And so far, President Trump has been very strong
in what he`s saying to our partners and allies about following U.S.
sanctions. And so far, that message has gotten a lukewarm, at best,
respond. So, that`s really a wild card in all of this.

If U.S. allies with sanctions, that could cause oil prices to rise more
dramatically, as we enter the summer driving season, but if Trump backs
off, given the pressure already faced from higher prices, we could see gas
prices back off as well. So, we have to see, will others follow our
sanctions?

GRIFFETH: Patrick DeHaan with GasBuddy, always good to see you. Thank
you. Have a good holiday.

DEHAAN: And you as well.

HERERA: Still ahead, you`ll meet young entrepreneurs leaving their marks
on the business world, and one that`s really socking it to `em.

But, first, Apple`s Tim Cook addresses the leaders of tomorrow.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TIM COOK, CEO, APPLE: Don`t just accept the status quo. No big challenge
has ever been solved and no lasting improvement has ever been achieved
unless people dares to try something different, dare to think different. I
was lucky to learn from someone who believed this deeply, someone who knew
that changing the world starts with following a vision, not a path. He was
my friend and mentor, Steve Jobs.

JEFF WINER, LINKEDIN CEO: I vowed that as long as I would be response for
managing other people, I would aspire to manage compassionately. That
meant pausing and being a spectator to my own thoughts, especially when
getting emotional. It meant walking a mile in the other person`s shoes and
understanding their hopes, their fears, their strengths and their
weaknesses. And it meant doing everything within my power to set them up
to be successful.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRIFFETH: One hundred years ago, people with the chromosome disorder known
as Down`s syndrome could expect to only live about ten years. Today, they
can expect to live into their 50s, perhaps longer. But the labor force
participation rate for people with any disability in the United States is
only about 20 percent. And that`s one reason a young entrepreneur with
Down`s syndrome got the bright idea to start his own business, selling
socks.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Down syndrome never hold you back?

JOHN CRONIN, CO-FOUNDER, JOHN`S CRAZY SOCKS: Down syndrome never hold me
back.

GRIFFETH: In fact, one might say John Cronin`s disability helps push him
forward. Starting his last year of high school in 2016 on New York`s Long
Island, John thought maybe he and his father, Mark, could start a business
together.

MARK X. CRONIN, JOHN`S CRAZY SOCKS CO-FOUNDER AND PRES.: We walked and
talked about starting a food truck. But as he points out neither of us can
really cook.

GRIFFETH: Instead, John cooked up an idea to sell socks.

J. CRONIN: I think it`s fun. I think the socks are colorful.

M. CRONIN: John, his whole life, had worn colorful, crazy socks. It was
kind of his thing.

J. CRONIN: John Lemon —

M. CRONIN: John Lemon stocks, you like those.

GRIFFETH: For about a thousand dollars, they build a Website, stocked some
socks, and by December 2016, they were online and in business, selling more
than $13,000 worth of socks in a month. John delivered a lot of them
himself, a long with “thank you” notes.

Going that extra mile is what John is all about.

M. CRONIN: Right away, we had people telling all the things John couldn`t
do. And John has spent his life demonstrating what he could do.

GRIFFETH: John, an avid snowshoer and soccer player, also decided to
donate a portion of the company`s profits to the Special Olympics, a cause
that he`s also lobbied Congress for.

M. CRONIN: People right away saw him as a role model. I had to wrap my
head around that because he is just my son.

GRIFFETH: In February of 2017, John designed a Down syndrome awareness
sock. For 2018, there is a new version.

J. CRONIN: I did it in yellow because it`s Down syndrome colors.

GRIFFETH: Now, among the more than 1,700 different types of socks they
sell, the flowers, the sport stars, the presidents past and present, there
are socks aimed at raising awareness of autism, breast cancer, and other
causes the company is donating to just a buck or two out of its sale.

And somehow, John also goes to trade shows to find new products. He
participated in a Massachusetts startup incubator. And he has travelled to
do speaking engagements. It`s been quite a year, and business hasn`t been
too bad either.

M. CRONIN: We shipped over 42,000 orders. And we did $1.7 million in
revenue.

GRIFFETH: But this story is less about dollars and more about what makes
sense. John is lucky. Most people with disabilities have few options
after high school.

M. CRONIN: It`s scary. The next big frontier is employment.

GRIFFETH: John`s Crazy Socks has grown to employ 34 people, 16 have
disabilities.

MATT CARVAJAL, EMPLOYEE: I go to warehouse and I put a sock, I get it
ready for shipping.

BRANDON MICHITSCH, EMPLOYEE: I learned to make new friends, and I get
along with everyone. And that`s what makes me happy.

M. CRONIN: We want the world to see what`s possible when you give someone
a chance. Things are not segregated here. Everybody works side by side.
And it`s a better workplace because of that.

J. CRONIN: I love you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I love you, too.

GRIFFETH: One where going that extra mile comes naturally.

M. CRONIN: We have to succeed, because if we don`t, we are letting these
guys down. And we have to show other businesses you can do this, too.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRIFFETH: And so far in 2018, John`s Crazy Socks is on track to top $2
million in total sales. In fact, one of his customers is former President
George H.W. Bush. Mr. Bush tweeted this picture of himself wearing John`s
sox on World Downs Syndrome Day. He also wore a pair at the funeral of his
beloved wife Barbara. The socks had images of books on them representing
the former first lady`s commitment to family literacy.

HERERA: So, obviously, life`s journey leads us in many different
directions. But sometimes , it`s what we learn and share with others that
provides the biggest rewards, even on a treasure hunt. And that`s what two
elementary school students outside of Chicago were finding ever since they
got the bright idea to create a board game for a school project. It is now
selling in target stores across the country.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Wild one.

HERERA: Brynna Siewers and Olivia Wasilewski couldn`t have learned what
they`d learn about themselves when a fourth grade project turned into a
board game that they would call Ship of Treasures. That was back in 2016.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One, two, three, four, five, six.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not opening that.

HERERA: It`s a treasure hunt. Four pirates hoping to avoid sharks,
cannonballs and, of course, the other pirates, while racing to find
treasures hidden by their opponents.

That November, their original school project won the grand prize at the
Chicago Toy and Game Fair`s Young Inventor`s Challenge.

They won trips to Target`s headquarters in Minneapolis and to the New York
Toy Fair as well as several grueling months of tweaking with the former
president of Pressman Toys, Jeff Pinsker, all in hopes of developing a
product that Target (NYSE:TGT) could sell.

JEFF PINSKER, FORMER PRESSMAN TOY PRESIDENT: We felt like there would be
kids to buy something and play something that`s invented by other kids.
Who knows better what`s going to appeal to kids than kids themselves?

HERERA: They learned to mix elements of skill like mapping with luck.
They also tweaked colors, materials and imagery.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The red girl pirates are modeled after us. I`m the
green one.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m the red.

PINSKER: They researched actual pirate terminology and things that
happened on ships to write these cards so they would be realistic. That
wasn`t something that I asked them to do. They took that extra step
themselves.

HERERA: That`s hardly the biggest step these two have taken however.
Their community was rocked in February of 2017. Sofie Shields, a fellow
student at Palos East Elementary School, lost her battle with cancer.
Brynna and Olivia responded.

Their game hit the Target (NYSE:TGT) store shelves in October and they were
honored at a school assembly and again, in November when the Toy and Game
Innovation Awards named them Young Inventors of the Year. That`s where
they announced a portion of their royalties about $4,000 so far will be
donated to Chicago`s Lurie Children`s Hospital where Sofie Shields was
treated.

MICHELLE SHIELDS, SOFIE`S MOTHER: It`s pretty amazing. It goes to show
the character and the ethics that this neighborhood really has and the
connection that we have together how much power can generate just by people
working together.

KOL SHIELDS, SOFIE`S BROTHER: It goes to show much power can generate just
by people working together.

OLIVIA WASILEWSKI, SHIP OF TREASURES INVENTOR: We decided since she went
to Lurie children`s that we should donate to Lurie Children`s in honor of
her.

BRYANNA SIEWERS, SHIP OF TREASURES INVENTOR: We saw the sadness
everywhere. And we just thought it would be the right thing to do.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Industrial design —

HERERA: Now, fifth graders, these two are looking forward even as their
proud parents wonder how they can possibly grasp the lessons that they`re
already teaching.

RICHELLE SIEWERS, BRYANNA`S MOTHER: That`s heavy for a 10, 11-year-old. I
mean, she just wanted to do something. I think as she grows, and as they
both grow, they`ll look back on this experience and think, oh, wow.

TOMASZ WASILEWSKI, OLIVIA`S FATHER: I don`t think they both realize what
impact they`re having. I mean, just going to inspire someone else to do
the same thing — and if it does, great.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALES: Ahoy, mateys.

HERERA: Hearts of gold, their most un-pirate like gesture might be proof
the most important treasures are hidden in sight of us.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HERERA: And Pressman Toys has sold more than 40,000 copies of Ship of
Treasures to Target (NYSE:TGT). And for more on Olivia and Brynna, you can
go to our Website NBR.com.

GRIFFETH: Coming up, is Hollywood getting bigger and bolder as it hunts
for the next blockbuster?

But, first, what ExxonMobil (NYSE:XOM) CEO and former secretary of state
gold graduates of the Virginia Military Institute.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REX TILLERSON, FORMER SECRETARY OF STATE: The world becomes more
interconnected and global challenges require sophisticated integrated
solutions, the value of integrity only grows in importance. In every
sector, integrity will be the key to unlocking high-impact technologies,
new ways to conduct business, and new approaches to solve our most vexing
geopolitical challenges that will make the world brighter for the
generation to come.

DAVID TEPPER, APPALOOSA MANAGEMENT FOUNDER: Right now, like I did — I
think right now, you all have negative balance sheets, but you have so much
upside. You all have great opportunities ahead. Don`t let anyone, anyone
tell you different. You will live in what was, is and always will be the
land of opportunity, and the most — and the greatest and most generous
country in the world.

(APPLAUSE)

Remember, remember this, last thing — when all of you become successful,
remember to give back. Give back.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HERERA: What is a summer without a big box office blockbuster or maybe
two? Hollywood is getting ready for what it hopes will be a very
profitable season.

Julia Boorstin has more.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I waited a long time for a shot like this.

JULIA BOORSTIN, NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT CORRESPONDENT: And the movie
industry has been waiting a long time for this summer. After a dismal 2017
summer box office that fell almost 14 percent over the prior summer,
studios are hoping “Solo” and other big-budget franchises will power to
record sales. The 18 weeks from the beginning of May until Labor Day
traditionally make up about 40 percent of annual box office revenue.

PAUL DERGARABEDIAN, COMSCORE: We`re heading towards another $11 billion a
year in North America and perhaps another $40 billion a year worldwide at
the box office. But the summer is all important, it still is, it`s still
the big show, and you can have all these big movies in there trying to make
their mark and build big box office.

BOORSTIN: And none other bigger than Disney (NYSE:DIS), a box office
juggernaut. The media giant accounts for more than a third of the North
American box office so far this year. It`s released just three new films
in 2018, including “Black Panther and “Avengers: Infinity War.” Its box
office totals bolstered by carry over from December`s “Star Wars: The Last
Jedi” released.

And Disney`s dominance is expected to continue after this weekend debut of
“Solo”. Next month, Pixar is bringing back “The Incredibles” for a sequel,
and in July, Marvel`s “Ant-Man and the Wasp” hit theaters.

Analysts predict the summer box office will be as much as 20 percent higher
than last year summer numbers. The CEO of the National Association of
Theater Owners going so far as to say the current quarter will be, quote,
gigantic.

There`s also a gigantic reliance on familiar franchises with about a dozen
sequels and spin-offs this summer.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hey, blue, you know me.

BOORSTIN: Among them, “Universal`s Jurassic World”, Paramount`s “Mission
Impossible: Fallout”, and Warner Bros` “Ocean`s Eight.”

But sequels don`t always equal box office gold. 2017 saw disappointing
results from some familiar fare as “The Mummy”, “Transformers” and “Alien”,
leading to a box office numbers studios don`t want to see again.

We don`t want to be below 4 billion. That`s never a good sign. If we do
that two years in a row, that is not good for the industry.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What do you think? Well, what do you know?

BOORSTIN: For NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT, I`m Julia Boorstin in Los Angeles.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HERERA: Thanks so much for joining us for this special edition of NIGHTLY
BUSINESS REPORT. I`m Sue Herera.

GRIFFETH: I`m Bill Griffeth. We offer a sincere thanks to the men and
women of the military on this Memorial Day.

END

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