Here’s where people on Main Street give Trump a 76% approval rating

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to decrease regulations surrounded by small business leaders in the Oval Office of the White House.Andrew Harrer | Getty Images

(President Donald Trump signs an executive order to decrease regulations while surrounded by small-business leaders in the Oval Office of the White House.)

The first-ever CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey found that small-business owners in all regions of the country are more optimistic than they were pessimistic on the economy and the future of their businesses. But the survey also uncovered that President Donald Trump is causing regional rifts in an entrepreneur’s level of bullishness.

The poll, conducted April 17-28, surveyed 2,030 self-identified small business owners nationwide.

Most striking is the very close correlation between the level of confidence and the level of approval of Trump. According to the survey, Trump enjoys a 76 percent approval rating among small-business owners in the South Atlantic region, and that region had the highest confidence level (64). He also has the same approval rating in North West Central— Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota— although the confidence level is lower at 63. In the least confident region, the Pacific, Trump has a 48 percent approval rating.

Here’s more on how the eight U.S. census regions differ in their views, and in their demographics, in order of the least confident to most confident. (Note: The East South Central region, which includes the states of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, is not included, because there was a statistically insignificant total of fewer than 100 responses from that region.)

    • Region: Pacific

      States: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 53

      Trump approval/disapproval: 48%/49%

      Respondents in the Pacific region reported the lowest confidence index score of all the regions, but at 53 the region’s small business owners are still slightly more optimistic than it is pessimistic.

      Pacific small-business owners were more likely than any other region to report current business conditions as “bad” (15 percent) and expect revenue to decrease (17 percent). They are also more likely to expect changes in tax policy, trade policy and immigration policy to have a negative effect on their businesses compared to other regions.

      Demographically, the region has the smallest percentage of white respondents (57 percent) and the highest percentage of those reporting “other” as their race or ethnicity (18 percent). Pacific small-business owners are 8 percent black, 8 percent Hispanic and 9 percent Asian.

      A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds a sign during his campaign rally at the Orange County Fair and Event Center, April 28, 2016, in Costa Mesa, California.

      David McNew | Getty Images
    • Region: Middle Atlantic

      States: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 56

      Trump approval/disapproval: 46%/54%

      This is the most polarized region when it comes to how business owners feel about Trump. Thirty-two percent strongly approve of the way he is handling his job, while 39 percent strongly disapprove. Respondents in this region were much less likely to have a moderated view of the president.

      Twenty-nine percent of the Middle Atlantic group think changes in trade policy will have a negative effect on their businesses over the next 12 months, which is more than any other region except the Pacific region (also at 29 percent).

      Mid-Atlantic small-business owners are also much more likely to have a web page for their business compared to other regions. Sixty-six percent of this group say they have a web page.

      Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stops at Geno's Steaks in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 22, 2016.

      Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images
    • Region: New England

      States: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 59

      Trump approval/disapproval: 50%/50%

      Small-business owners were most likely to say they “Strongly Disapprove” of the job Trump is doing as president (40 percent). Not surprising, since the president won only one of the region’s 33 electoral votes last November. Despite that, 48 percent of respondents say business conditions are “good,” and 37 percent expect to increase headcount in the next 12 months (more than any other region.)

      This was the only region with more owners (25 percent) saying customer demand was the most critical issue facing their business (for all other regions, “Taxes” was the most popular choice). They’re also more likely than other regions to say terrorism or foreign policy matter most to them right now.

      Demographically, only 28 percent of New England small-business owners to respond to the survey are women, which is fewer than any other region. Twenty-three percent of respondents have a post-graduate degree, more than any other region.

      (A sign in front of a hair salon in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, welcomes Trump during campaign.)

      In 2011, a sign outside a hair salon welcomes Donald Trump on April 27, 2011 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

      Getty Images
    • Region: West South Central

      States: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 61

      Trump approval/disapproval: 63%/26%

      Small-business owners in this region are most likely to say business conditions are “good” (48 percent). Sixty-two percent expect revenue to increase, which is more than any other region except the South Atlantic (64 percent).

      Small-business owners in this region are more likely to say education is the issue that matters most to them right now. That’s interesting, because 9 percent of the respondents in this region never finished high school and only 39 percent have a college degree (compare that to 51 percent of New England small-business owners).

      The West South Central region also has the highest percentage of Hispanic respondents (20 percent).

      (Trump visits the Texas-Mexico border.)

      Then Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to photographers during his trip to the border in Laredo, Texas on July 23, 2015.

      Getty Images
    • Region: Mountain

      States: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 61

      Trump approval/disapproval: 60%/40%

      The Mountain region was the only region with a majority of respondents saying health care is the issue that matters most to them right now. For all other regions, “jobs and economy” was the most popular response.

      The region also had the highest number of respondents (14 percent) saying immigration is the most important issue. Twenty-nine percent say changes to immigration policy will have a positive effect on their business, which is second highest among all the regions.

      Candidate Donald Trump speaks at the 2016 Western Conservative Summit at the Colorado Convention Center on July 1, 2016 in Denver.

      Getty Images
    • Region: East North Central

      States: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin

      Confidence index (0–100 scale): 63

      Trump approval/disapproval: 65%/35%

      Small-business owners in the region that arguably won Trump the presidency still have a high opinion of his early efforts, with 39 percent strongly approving of his performance.

      Taxes are very important to this region, and most appear to think the new administration will deliver better tax policy. Fifty-four percent of respondents in this region say that changes in tax policy over the next 12 months will have a positive impact on their businesses. Thirty-one percent of respondents in this region also say taxes are the most critical issue facing their business.

      They’re also optimistic about other elements of the Trump agenda, with 31 percent saying changes in immigration policy over the next 12 months will have a positive effect on their businesses (more than any other region), and 41 percent saying changes in regulation will have a positive effect.

      Forty-six percent of East North Central small-business owners have at least a college degree, making this region’s small-business owners the second-best educated, behind New England.

      Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to guests at a campaign rally on December 21, 2015 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

      Getty Images
  • Region: West North Central

    States: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota

    Confidence index (0–100 scale): 63

    Trump approval/disapproval: 76%/24%

    More small-business owners strongly approve of Trump in this region (45 percent) than in any other region. Perhaps it’s because they believe the administration will deliver on its promise to pass new health-care legislation.

    Respondents in this region are more likely than all other regions to say “cost of employee health care” is the most critical issue facing their business. Forty-nine percent of respondents expect changes in government regulations to have a positive effect on their businesses, also more than any other region.

    Eighty-nine percent of respondents in this region are white, making it the least diverse region in the country for small-business owners.

    A Trump sign in Dexter, Iowa.

    Getty Images
  • Region: South Atlantic

    States: Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia

    Confidence index (0–100 scale): 64

    Trump approval/disapproval: 76%/24%

    Nowhere is the correlation between small-business confidence and Trump approval stronger than in the South Atlantic, where the confidence index is 64 (higher than any other region), and 76 percent of respondents approve of the way Trump is handling his job.

    Sixty-four percent of respondents in the South Atlantic expect sales to increase, and 33 percent expect to increase headcount in the next 12 months. Forty-five percent say changes in tax policy will help their businesses, and 44 percent say changes in government regulations will help their businesses.

    The South Atlantic region is the largest in terms of number of respondents and the most diverse. Forty-seven percent of respondents in this region are female (more than any other region), and 19 percent are black (also more than any other region). Another 10 percent are Hispanic. Forty-one percent have a college degree, but 24 percent are running their businesses with just a high school diploma or GED.

    (Trump goes tieless for a rally in Orlando.)

    President Donald Trump holds a campaign rally at the AeroMod International hangar at Orlando Melbourne International Airport on February 18, 2017.

This entry was posted in Small Business. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply