Tonight on a special edition Nightly Business Report, we’ll talk business and budgets as President Trump closes out his first month in the White House.

Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Unilever rejects Kraft’s $143 billion bid, but the story isn’t over just yet. Plus, did President Trump give coal country a shot in the arm?

Sales from builder Toll Brothers might signal cheaper Manhattan condos.

The California-based company reported a loss on Thursday, though it was not as bad as analysts expected.

Amazon discloses it generated $6.4 billion in revenue related to “retail subscription services” last year.

Two leading chief investment strategists tell CNBC that Trump’s promised pro-growth agenda should help drive the stock market even higher.

Tonight on Nightly Business Report, don’t look now, but the economy is firing on all cylinders.
Plus, what President Trump’s new pick to lead the Labor Department might mean for millions of American workers.

Today President Trump announced the nomination of the new labor secretary. Kayla Tausche takes a look at who he is and why he was chosen.

During the meeting of major world economic powers, one issue on the table was spending on NATO. Hadley Gamble reports.

Steve Liesman reports why the budget, infrastructure spending and tax cuts may set up the next economic and political battle.

Kate Rogers talks to a small business owner to learn about what regulations she would like to see removed under the Trump administration.

As Snapchat prepares to launch an initial public offering that could value the company at more than $20 billion, Bob Pisani reports there are a number of other firms that are hoping to make their Wall Street debuts as well.

Tonight on Nightly Business Report, don’t look now, but the economy is firing on all cylinders.
Plus, what President Trump’s new pick to lead the Labor Department might mean for millions of American workers.

Many small businesses are anxiously waiting to see how Trump will act on federal regulations.

Americans should stop expecting a different President Donald Trump than candidate Trump, the former Obama and Clinton aide tells CNBC.